Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Public Domain Fishing Titles

From a great refernce found on Riverkeeper Flies --

The Art of Angling by Richard Brookes, MD (1740) – 1st edition
The Art of Angling by Richard Brookes, MD (1766)
The Art of Angling by Richard Brookes, MD (1781) – 5th edition
The Art of Angling by Richard Brookes, MD (1790) 7th edition
Art of Angling by Thomas Best (1807)
The Fly-Fisher’s Guide by Geo. C. Bainbridge (1816)
Art of Angling by Charles Bowlker (1826)
The Fly-Fisher’s Entomology by Alfred Ronalds (1836), 1st edition
The Angler’s Manual; or Fly-Fisher’s Oracle, by John Turton (1836)
The Northern Angler; or Fly-Fisher’s Companion by John Kirkbride (1837)
Art of Angling by Charles Bowlker (1839)
The Fly-Fisher’s Entomology by Alfred Ronalds (1839), 2nd edition
The Contemplative and Practical Angler by Joseph Wells (1842)
Handbook of Angling: Teaching Fly-Fishing, Trolling, Bottom-Fishing, and Salmon-Fishing; with the Natural History of River Fish, and the Best Modes of Catching Them by Ephemera (Edward Fitzgibbon) (1847)
The British Angler’s Manual by Thomas Christopher Hofland (1848)
Book of Salmon by Ephemera (Edward Fitzgibbon) (1850)
Art of Angling by Charles Bowlker (1854) – a new edition, revised – perhaps the best known version
Art of Angling and Complete System of Fly Making, and Dying of Colours by William Blacker (1842 )
Catechism of Fly Making Angling and Dyeing by William Blacker (1843 edition)
Art of Flymaking, Angling, and Dying of Colours by William Blacker (1855 edition)
The American Angler’s Guide by John J. Brown (1857 edition)
The Practical Angler by W. C. Stewart (1857)
Halcyon: Or, Rod-fishing with Fly, Minnow, and Worm by Henry Wade (1861)
The American Angler’s Book by Thad. Norris (1864)
Autumns of the Spey by A. E. Knox (1872)
My Life as an Angler by William Henderson (1876)
Yorkshire Trout Flies by T. E. Pritt (1885) Note – The following book is the same text, only the title was changed.
North Country Flies by T.E. Pritt (1886)
Floating Flies and How to Dress Them by Frederic M. Halford (1886)
Ogden on Fly Tying, etc. by James Ogden (1887)
British Angling Flies by Michael Theakston (1888)
Favorite Flies and Their History by Mary Orvis Marbury (1892)
How to Tie Salmon Flies by Captain Hale (1892)
The Salmon Fly: How to Dress It and How to Use It by Geo. M. Kelson (1895)
Salmon Sea Trout by Sir Herbert Maxwell (1897)
A Dictionary of Trout and Bass Flies by Malcolm A. Shipley (1898)
The Trout Fly Dresser’s Cabinet of Devices or How to Tie Flies for Trout and Grayling Fishing by H. G. McClelland (1898; 2nd edition 1905; 3rd edition 1909; 4th edition 1919)
Tips by Geo. M. Kelson (1901)
Dry-Fly Fishing the Theory and Practice by Frederic. M. Halford (1902)
Salmon Fishing by John James Hardy (1907)
Book of the Dry Fly by George A. B. Dewar (1910)
Modern Development of the Dry Fly by Frederic M. Halford (1910)
Practical Dry-Fly Fishing by Emlyn M, Gill (1912)
Fishing at Home and Abroad by Sir Herbert Maxwell (1913)
How to Dress Salmon Flies by T. E. Pryce-Tannatt (1914)
The Dry Fly and Fast Water by George M. L. La Branche (1914)
Brook and River Trouting by Harfield H. Edmonds and Norman N. Lee (1916)
A Book on Angling by Francis Francis (1920) – First edition was 1847
Salmon Fishing by W. Earl Hodgson (1920)
A History of Fly Fishing for Trout by John Waller Hills (1921)
The Natural Trout Fly and It’s Imitation by Leonard West (1921) – First edition  1912
Secrets of the Salmon by Edward Ringwood Hewitt (1922)

Thursday, January 30, 2020

In Pursuit of the Smallest Catch






Catching tiny fish only a couple of centimeters in size called Tanago, or Japanese bitterling, is a passion shared by some fanatical Japanese anglers. Fumihiko Nagatani, a sushi chef with 40 years of experience catching the so-called "underwater jewels," uses a microscope to file down fishing hooks in the hope of catching small Tanago less than 2cm long. Discover the eccentric yet fascinating world of Japanese "micro fishing" that involves tiny tools to catch tiny fish.

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How to Get Your Flies Out of Trees

You may want to give this a try next time you hang up your fly in a tree.  One thing NEVER EVER EVER do is to reef back on your tenkara rod until something breaks.  If you do, something will break - it may be your tippet, it may be your rod.

When all else fails, collapse your rod, pull directly on your line.  It only takes a few seconds to collapse your rod, and it can save you from having to stop fishing because of a broken rod.


Thursday, October 31, 2019